Leadership sponsors month-long fundraiser

Science teacher Marc Pooler passes out FRQs during sixth period. Pooler, one of 24 teachers who took part in the Dare Week fundraiser, agreed to shave his beard to raise money. He shaved in stages, one stage being Tuesday’s handlebar mustache.

photo by Kacy Lach

Science teacher Marc Pooler passes out FRQs during sixth period. Pooler, one of 24 teachers who took part in the Dare Week fundraiser, agreed to shave his beard to raise money. He shaved in stages, one stage being Tuesday’s handlebar mustache.

Jeannie Williams, Editor-in-Chief

$300 for extra credit.

$230 for a karaoke singer.

$114 to shave the beard.

From Monday, Feb. 6 to Friday, Feb. 9, Dare Week, a series of challenges taken up by teachers, brought in over $2,600 as part of a month-long effort to raise money for Children’s Miracle Network and Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children. Throughout February, the school will continue to focus on fundraising through dress-up days, spirit nights and a dance marathon.

Some, like English teacher Victoria Babington, turned Dare Week into a competition between classes. Babington’s sixth period class raised the most money, so they got to participate in an “epic water bottle flipping contest.”  She participated in honor of a family friend, a 2-year-old battling liver cancer.

Babington’s story is a reminder of the meaningful cause behind the month-long event. Children’s Miracle Network supports and provides community support for children’s hospitals across the country.

“This is an important cause that means a lot to our community,” Dare Week chairwoman Brianna Hira said. “I know I’m going to be broke from [Dare Week], but it’s for a really good cause.”

Even more money is expected from the Tundrathon, a dance marathon taking place on Friday, Feb. 24. Tundrathon is part of Dance Marathon, a national program founded to raise money for Children’s Miracle Network.

The week leading up to it will feature four dress-up days. There will be no school Monday, Feb. 20, but on Tuesday, students can dress up as ‘dynamic duos.’ Wednesday will be Decades Day. Freshmen dress up like the ‘50s, sophomores like the ‘60s and ‘70s, juniors like the 80s and seniors like the ‘90s. The next day, students will dress up as their favorite music genre. Finally, on Friday, students should wear their Tundrathon t-shirts in anticipation for that night’s event.

“It’s very similar to homecoming, but this is for a great cause,” Tundrathon committee member Karley Harms said.

Harms recommends wearing athletic shorts and tennis shoes to the event, as a wide variety of activities will be offered.  Cornhole, ping-pong, photo ops and face painting will be offered.  There will also be a jail that students can pay to put their friends in and pay to get out of. Artists can also be metaphorically placed in jail, and students can pay in order to get them out so the DJ can play their songs.

Sponsors, including Jeremiah’s Italian Ice, Jersey Mike’s Subs and Insomnia Cookies, donated food, so concessions will be pure profit.

“We want our costs to be minimized and our fundraising to be maximized,” event chairwoman Camden Uhl said. “The only thing we really have to pay for is the DJ, and he’s giving us a really great rate because he knows it’s for a good cause.”

An inspiration table will also be at the Tundrathon, where students can write notes to kids staying at Arnold Palmer.  The idea was borrowed from UCF’s dance marathon, called Knight-Thon.

“As high schoolers, we get wrapped up in worrying about school, but we need to look out into the world and see how fortunate we are for our health,” Harms said.

Spirit nights were also held to help fundraise at Tijuana Flats on Feb. 6, Texas Roadhouse on Feb. 7 and Chipotle on Feb. 13, but final fundraising amounts from these events are not yet known.

Tickets will be on sale at lunch through Feb. 24, for $25, and will include a t-shirt until Friday, Feb. 17.

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