Encanto: another enchanted Disney film

Released+in+theaters+Nov.+24%2C+Disney%E2%80%99s+%E2%80%9CEncanto%E2%80%9D+adds+to+their+list+of+films+to+represent+other+cultures.+%E2%80%9CEncanto%E2%80%9D+tells+the+story+of+an+Indigenous+Zenu+family+in+Colombia+and+is+the+first+Disney+feature-length+animated+musical+set+in+Latin+America.

photo by Disney

Released in theaters Nov. 24, Disney’s “Encanto” adds to their list of films to represent other cultures. “Encanto” tells the story of an Indigenous Zenu family in Colombia and is the first Disney feature-length animated musical set in Latin America.

Magic, music, bright colors and sparkles are the iconic elements that make Disney movies so special. The magic of a hidden valley blessed with a gift of a magic candle is home to the family Madrigal. “Encanto” tells the story of an Indigenous Zenu family in Colombia and is the first Disney feature-length animated musical set in Latin America.

Released in theaters Nov. 24, Disney’s “Encanto” adds to their list of films to represent other cultures. With fantastic animation, tear-jerking moments and a catchy soundtrack, this film lives up to viewers’ expectations. The Madrigals are an extraordinary family who live hidden in the mountains of Colombia in a charmed place called the Encanto. The movie follows the character Mirabel (Stephanie Beatriz), the only child in the family not blessed with a unique gift from the magic of the Encanto. She becomes the family’s last hope as she discovers the magic surrounding the valley is in danger. 

Directors Byron Howard and Jared Bush took a two-week trip to Colombia to absorb information about the destination and culture. This trip clearly paid off as the movie reflected the details and focus of Colombia’s diversity of nature, music, people, food and culture.

Similar to its ability to capture Colombian culture, “Encanto” does a great job of handling and telling the story of multiple complex characters. Even though Mirabel is the main character, “Encanto” thoroughly tells the story of the rest of her large family, too.

Mirabel may not add to the line of Disney princesses, but she has the capability to become a fan favorite due to her relatability. Mirabel is somewhat of an outcast in her family since she is not gifted with any powers. The disconnection she feels is made very clear from the beginning and is covered in multiple songs she sings. Although she does not have any magic of her own, she is able to uncover truths about her family and save her home.

In her journey to save the Encanto, Mirabel learns that her sisters, Luisa (Jessica Darrow) and Isabela (Diane Guerrero) are less happy with their gifts than she had originally thought. Both sisters share that they are having trouble meeting the high expectations and pressure they feel from their Abuela (María Cecilia Botero) and the community they are sworn to help. 

The song “Surface Pressure,” sung by Luisa, summarizes her feelings of being expected to carry all this weight of expectation on her shoulders, ironic because her gift is super strength. One thing that makes this a modern Disney movie is the treatment of stress and pressure. Meeting expectations, cracking under pressure and the effects of not sharing problems are thoroughly represented throughout “Encanto.” 

Characters and plot throughout the film did not feel cheesy or childish like most Disney movies do. However, the classic Disney formula was followed, the plot was unexpected yet familiar, filled with moments of laughter and tears. The music and adventure in “Moana,” and the colorful animation from “Coco” seemed to be apparent in this film. The consistency of these elements make this film a true Disney movie. Even as viewers get older and think they have grown out of kids’ movies, there is a message for everyone in Disney films.  

495 Views