Legend in the making

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Legend in the making

Aidan Kramer warms up on the driving range before the match against DeLand.

Aidan Kramer warms up on the driving range before the match against DeLand.

photo by Juliana Joyner

Aidan Kramer warms up on the driving range before the match against DeLand.

photo by Juliana Joyner

photo by Juliana Joyner

Aidan Kramer warms up on the driving range before the match against DeLand.

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A summer in De Pere, Wisconsin was all it took for two-year-old Aidan Kramer to find his passion. In an afternoon with his dad at the driving range, Kramer developed an instant love for the game of golf.

“When I was young, I wouldn’t watch cartoons,” Kramer said. “I would go downstairs and watch the Golf Channel instead.”

Now, 15 years later, he is committed to play Division I golf at Georgia Tech.

Kramer has led the Hagerty golf team in all four years of his high school career and has improved each year. He has dominated all players through the regular season, as the lowest player in each of the events he has played in. He leads the team this year with a 34.4 scoring average, the lowest in school history, and holds the nine and 18-hole school records, with a 32 and 67 respectively.

Playing golf at this level has always been a dream for Kramer, as he has traveled all around the country participating in tournaments. After looking at all the universities he could attend, he chose Georgia Tech.

The golf program at Georgia Tech is one of the best in the country, with golf legend alumni like Bobby Jones, Matt Kuchar and Stewart Cink. Georgia Tech stood out to him because of the school’s unique golf program.

“If you do what the coaches tell you, and follow the model that they set, you can make the PGA Tour from there,” Kramer said. “It has been a goal of mine for a very long time and I want to be able to make it to that level.”

Kramer has taken multiple trips to Atlanta to spend time with the players and coaches while viewing the facilities. He believes he will excel in the environment there, and that nothing will be holding him back there to achieve his goal, the PGA Tour.

“Maybe I will [make the PGA Tour] and maybe I won’t, but all the resources are there for me to succeed,” Kramer said. “Their on-campus practice facility and the courses they have access to, are second to none. There is no better place to hone your skills at the game of golf then Georgia Tech.”

Before his commitment in 2017, Kramer participated in a tournament days before the high school golf season began. Before his second round, he felt a sharp stabbing pain in his back.

“I was in a fairway bunker and I had to lift it over the edge, and I felt the entire left side of my back-muscle tear,” Kramer said.

This injury severely limited his range of motion, leaving Kramer unable to perform at his best. After the tournament, his outlook for the high school season was in jeopardy, as his back would take six to eight weeks to heal.

Per FHSAA rules, in order to participate in the postseason, a player must participate in five regular season matches to become eligible for the postseason.

While sitting around his house, he swung left-handed with no pain. His dad told him there was no way of re-injuring it if there was no pain, so he played left handed, and shot a 45. He continued to turn in scores and became eligible for the postseason.

“I’ve only done it as a joke in the past but after practicing left-handed for about ten minutes I started to get the hang of it,” Kramer said. “At that point I was good enough to be able to turn in a score. It wasn’t a matter of winning or my scoring average, it was just about becoming eligible.”

After he became eligible and recovered from his injury, he led the team to a second-place conference finish and second place district finish.

Kramer will be enrolling in the fall of 2020 and will be majoring in Engineering.

“They match against the best competition against the best players at the best courses,” Kramer said. “It is a very competitive environment and I will be able to find out truly how good I am.”

 

 

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